The website “Archives of Japanese Honeybee Beekeeping” launched (Rika Shinkai, Project Researcher)

FEAST HQ Achievements, Report, WG3

We have recently launched a website “Archives of Japanese Honeybee Beekeeping” to introduce the history and culture of Japanese honeybee beekeeping.

As many of you may know, there are two types of honeybees in Japan – native Japanese honeybees (Apis cerana japonica) and Western honeybees (Apis mellifera), which were brought to Japan in the Meiji era. And, most of the honeys on the market today are of the latter.

The beekeeping of Japanese honeybees started in mountainous areas at the latest in the Edo period, and honey was then distributed and consumed for medicinal purposes. When kneading pills, for example, honey was a necessary ingredient. In “Hachimitsu Ichiran (Overview of Honey)” published in 1872, various images of beekeeping procedures are illustrated in the Ukiyoe style (Fig. 1). However, after Western honeybees and modern beekeeping techniques were introduced, Japanese honeybees with less honey yield become less and less popular and available and the honey was only locally consumed (not widely available for sale).

By the way, I still have the first edition of picture book “Konchuu (Insects)” published by Gakken in 1970, which I used in my elementary school days. The section on honeybees only describes Western honeybees, reading “they were introduced from Europe to harvest honey…”, and no mention on native Japanese honeybees at all. At one point, honeybees exclusively meant Western honeybees, and Japanese honeybees were somehow “forgotten”.

Since the 1980s, some reports on local beekeeping of Japanese honeybees started to be published. According to these reports, the beekeeping method of Western honeybees and its beehive type were rather standardized, whereas the “traditional” way of beekeeping were continuously carried out in mountainous areas and showcased diversity and reginal characteristics as in the shapes and materials of beehives and tools. Ecological studies on Japanese honeybees became more prominent after the 1990s. Then, hobby beekeeping of Japanese honeybees became one of the fads in the 2010s, and more and more websites to share information and knowledge about beekeeping techniques and relevant SNS are currently available.

However, little literature on the history and cultural aspects of Japanese honeybee beekeeping were available especially before the Edo period. Thus, a lot of things still remain unknown such as how Japanese honeybee beekeeping survived after the introduction of Western honeybees. In addition, many of anthropological and ethnographic studies on Japanese honeybee beekeeping have been published in academic journals and local history reports etc., making it relatively difficult for the general public to get hold of and fully understand the literature.

This website aims at capturing the overall history and cultural aspects of Japanese honeybee beekeeping with the following main contents: 1) a database of the available literature in the field of humanities, 2) the history of Japanese honeybee beekeeping and relevant literature, 3) photographs of various beehives and beekeeping tools across Japan (Fig. 2), and 4) a short documentary film of traditional Japanese honeybee beekeeping. The film captures the raw and vivid images of beekeeping processes and surrounding landscapes that cannot be sufficiently portrayed only with texts and photos. We also hope to effectively utilize this film to further the discussion on Japanese honeybee beekeeping across Japan and compare the different regions to explore both differences and similarities. Some of the contents are also available in English so that they can be used for the beekeeping research and comparative studies of native honeybees in neighboring Asian countries and regions such as South Korea, China, and Taiwan.

The beekeeping of Japanese honeybees is often carried out as part of multiple livelihood system, others of which include forestry, charcoal making, shiitake mushroom and orchard cultivation, hunting, and river fishing. Beekeeping research may, therefore, highlight other aspects of local livelihoods in an unexpected way. For example, we interviewed a local blacksmith who produces tools for harvesting honey in Kozagawa area, Wakayama Prefecture, in the summer of 2019 when we were filming the documentary of traditional beekeeping. Those so-called “Nokaji” or village blacksmiths have drastically decreased in Japan. However, when he talked about his proud work with such details as the length of honey harvesting tools and how to make the handle, and how he tailors tools to the preference and convenience of beekeepers, he surely reminded us of these fine techniques of local craftsmen supporting local agriculture, forestry and livelihoods for a long period of time.

We hope that this website will be widely used not only by beekeepers and researchers, but also by anyone who is interested in honeybees.

*This website is viewable on a smartphone, but it is easier to view on a larger PC screen.

The development of Archives of Japanese Honeybee Beekeeping was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science’s Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 19K01215), the 2019 Interactive Communication Initiative of Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN : a constituent member of NIHU) and the FEAST Project of RIHN (No.14200116).

<Reference>
Gakken’s Picture Book “Konchuu (Insects)” (the 1970 edition to the revised 1990 edition), Gakken

Fig.1: Tanba, Shuji (ed), Gekkou Mizoguchi (illustrator). (1872) “Oshie Gusa: Hachimitsu Ichiran (Textbook: Overview of Honey)”

Fig 2: Various types of beehives used in different regions of Japan

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Translated by Yuko K.)

ホームページ「ニホンミツバチ・養蜂文化ライブラリー」開設(プロジェクト研究員 真貝理香)

FEAST HQ WG3, レポート, 成果

このたび、ニホンミツバチの養蜂の歴史・文化に関する「ニホンミツバチ・養蜂文化ライブラリー(Archives of Japanese Honeybee Beekeeping)」というホームページをオープンしました。

ご存じの方も多いと思いますが、我が国には、在来のニホンミツバチ(Apis cerana japonica)と、明治期に移入されたセイヨウミツバチ(Apis mellifera)が存在し、市販されているハチミツのほとんどは、セイヨウミツバチによるものです。

ニホンミツバチの養蜂は、遅くとも江戸時代には山間域を中心に行われ、主に薬用目的で流通もされていました。丸薬を練る際にも、ハチミツが必要でした。明治5(1872)年版、「蜂蜜一覧」には、養蜂の様々な場面が浮世絵風に描かれています(図1)。しかし、セイヨウミツバチの近代養蜂導入以降、採蜜量の少ないニホンミツバチは、ハチミツも地域内消費(一部販売)に留まる程度で、国内的な認知度も低くなったようです。

ちなみに私の手元には、自分が小学生時代に愛用した、1970年初版の学研の図鑑『昆虫』がありますが、ミツバチの項目には「みつをとるために、ヨーロッパから入ってきたもの(後略)」と、セイヨウミツバチに関する解説が書かれており、ニホンミツバチという在来種がいることは明記されていません。一時期はそれほど「忘れられかけた」存在ですらありました。

1980年代以降、各地域のニホンミツバチの養蜂の事例報告が、徐々にみられるようになり、セイヨウミツバチの養蜂スタイルや、養蜂箱がほぼ定型化しているのに比べて、「伝統的」ともいえる養蜂が行われてきた山間地域では、巣箱の形状や素材、養蜂道具はバリエーションに富み、地域性がみられることがわかってきました。1990年代以降は、昆虫としてのニホンミツバチの生態学的な研究が増加し、2010年代になると、ニホンミツバチの趣味養蜂のブームもあり、現在では、養蜂技術の情報交換サイトやSNSも大幅に増えました。

しかし、ニホンミツバチの養蜂の歴史や文化的側面については、特に江戸時代以前については文献も少なく、セイヨウミツバチの導入後も、どのようにニホンミツバチの養蜂が各地で存続してきたかなど、いまだにあまりわかっていないことも多いのです。また、ニホンミツバチの養蜂の文化人類学的、民俗学的な調査・研究は、学会誌や、地方史などに掲載されているものも多く、なかなか一般の方が、文献を把握しきれないという課題もありました。

そこで今回のサイトでは、主に、ニホンミツバチの養蜂の、文化的側面や歴史をとらえることを主眼にし、1)人文系の既出文献のデータベース、2)ニホンミツバチの養蜂の歴史、歴史的文献の紹介、3)各地の巣箱や養蜂道具の写真(図2)、4)伝統的養蜂のショートフィルムを、主要コンテンツとしました。映像は、文章や写真だけではとらえきれない養蜂の作業風景や、周辺の景観も捉える時に有効で、今後、日本全体を俯瞰した形でのニホンミツバチ養蜂の総論、地域間の相互比較(地域差や共通点)を行う際にも利用していきたいと思っています。また、韓国・中国・台湾といった周辺アジア諸国・地域の在来ミツバチの養蜂研究や比較にも役立つよう、部分的に英文も併記しています。

ニホンミツバチの養蜂は、林業や製炭、シイタケや果樹栽培、狩猟、川漁などの複合生業として行われることも多く、養蜂の調査が、思いがけず、養蜂以外の地域の暮らしを映し出すこともあります。昨年(2019年)夏に、和歌山県古座川流域の伝統養蜂のフィルムを作成した折は、採蜜道具を作る、地元の鍛冶屋さんも取材しました。こうした「野鍛冶(農鍛冶)」と呼ばれる、いわゆる「村の鍛冶屋」は、今では、全国的にも少なくなってしまいました。しかし、採蜜道具の長さや取っ手の作りなど、養蜂家の好みや使い勝手に合わせて作ってきた鍛冶屋さんのお話を聞いた時、こうした細やかな技術が、地域の農林業や暮らしを長らく支えてきたことを思いおこさせてくれました。

当ホームページが、養蜂家の方や研究者のみならず、ミツバチに興味のある多くの方々に活用されることを願っています。

※このサイトはスマートフォンでも、見ることができますが、パソコンの大きなスクリーンでみていただいたほうが、見やすい構成になっています。

<ニホンミツバチ・養蜂文化ライブラリー>は、
JSPS科研費(19K01215)「日本各地の山間域における、伝統的ニホンミツバチ養蜂の総合的研究と映像化」、大学共同利用法人人間文化研究機構2019年度「博物館・展示を活用した最先端研究の可視化・高度化事業」、大学共同利用法人人間文化研究機構総合地球環境学研究所FEASTプロジェクト(No. 14200116)の助成を受けて、作成されました。

<引用文献>
学研の図鑑『昆虫』(1970年版〜1990年改定版)学研出版社

図1:丹波修治 編撰、溝口月耕 図画 (1872 )教草(おしえぐさ)『蜂蜜一覧』

図2:巣箱のバリエーション