Envisioning ideal future school lunches (Steven McGreevy, Project Leader)

FEAST HQ Events, Report, Seminar & Workshop

On March 24th, 2019 a group of around 50 people of all ages gathered in Obuse Town, Nagano Pref., to envision the ideal school lunch thirty years in the future. The event represented one of the first steps for a new civic food network, the Obuse Food Policy Council (Shoku to Nou no Mirai Kaigi), to develop food policy together. FEAST has been working in Northern Nagano Prefecture for some time and partnered with Obuse Food Policy Council in the development of the event. FEAST also partnered with  the NAGANO Nou to Shoku no Kai NPO (NAGANO農と食の会), the Seikatsu Club Obuse Branch (生活クラブ小布施支部), and the Food Literacy and Experiential Education Collaboration NPO (NPO 食育体験教室・コラボ) to host the event. Participants ranged from farmers, city officials, community organizers, parents, and elementary, middle, and high school students.

Why school lunch?
As FEAST member Iwashima Fumi presented in her talk at the workshop, school lunch in Japan has an interesting history and has evolved a lot over time. School lunch holds a special place in Japanese society and not only educates children about food culture and taste, but reinforces the priorities of the society of the time. For example, after World War II, school lunches were free of charge and provided for every elementary student, whereas now the shift toward larger-scale lunch preparation centers and cost-saving is more common. A push toward including more locally-sourced ingredients on lunch menus is evident, but is it enough? As Japan moves into a future with fewer students, more regional economic precarity, and a deteriorating natural environment, a reassessment of what school lunch is meant to provide and the role it can play in society is warranted.

In true transdisciplinary fashion, the decision to envision future ideal school lunches was decided upon through deliberation between FEAST members and local organizers. Many discussions were held about a visioning target that would appeal to a large group of people beyond the active group (See this blog post for more details about “visioning”). The Obuse Food Policy Council was established in the fall of 2018 and was eager to hold a visioning workshop to kickstart their efforts to develop sustainable and innovative local food policy for their town. Local government officials, including the mayor Mr. Ryozo Ichimura, have been very supportive and there are high levels of engagement. Many involved in the discussions argued that the scale of Obuse is much smaller than, for example Nagano City, and that implementing new food policy on school lunches might be a smoother process. NAGANO Nou to Shoku no Kai, a diverse group of organic farmers, obento sellers, businesses, and citizen-consumers, was also supportive of the idea to focus on school lunch and hopes to take the experiences of Obuse Town and spread them through Nagano Prefecture.

Ideal visions of future school lunches
Many interesting and exciting ideas for what school lunch should be like in the future were generated at the workshop. We also had the pleasure of a graphic recorder (Aruga Yu) who did a fantastic job recording the overall discussion in an amazing artwork shown below. The visions can be divided into four themes: Core principles, Redefining the meaning of school lunch, Diet, and Innovation

Core principles
-Local citizens should be given more power to decide food-related policies as they affect school lunch.
-Greater transparency in the decisions behind providing school lunches. Where is food sourced and how was it grown? What are the financial conditions behind decisions to provide a certain level of food quality?
-We see school lunch as a part of the mandatory education system – it is called “Shokuiku” (food education) after all—and, therefore, should be free for all students. Prefectural or local municipal governments should subsidize.
-Locally sourced food should be prioritized (as close to 100% as possible) to strengthen regional economic conditions.
-School lunches should be safe for both student health and the environment. Ingredients should be organic and GMOs should be avoided.
-Food waste should be eliminated throughout the school lunch value chain. Food waste should be composted or fed to livestock.
-As much as possible, more women should be represented in the decision-making processes around school lunch and hold positions of power in bodies that make these decisions.

Redefining the meaning of school education through food/lunches
Through food production and consumption, we learn valuable skills that will serve us throughout our lives. Food is a lens that helps us appreciate life and living natural systems. Life skills such as nutrition literacy, gardening, animal raising, cooking, and creating fertile soil are something everyone should know. A comprehensive educational curriculum that incorporates many elements of food production, preparation, and consumption on school grounds is ideal. One way to describe this education is through “Self-Cultivation” – how we can grow ourselves by learning about where our food comes from and how to grow healthy food.
-School grounds should have large-scale gardens and food production capacities. Growing vegetables, raising chickens, maintaining fruit orchards, growing mushrooms etc. are just some examples.
-When not in use, the swimming pool could be converted into an aquaculture tank to raise fish
-Butcher animals to learn about the responsibilities that come with taking life to feed oneself
-Students should be involved in cooking school lunches and learning recipes, gain kitchen skills
-Students should learn how to process food in valuable ways. Making the school lunch miso, pickles, etc.
-Students should be able to make their own tableware (cups, plates, bowls) to eat with and clean during lunch
-More time in the school day should be given for eating slowly, enjoying your meal with others (Convivial lunch)

Diet/Menu
What we eat for lunch influences our performance at school, educates us about the diversity of food choices, and can expose us to healthy options.
-School lunch food should acknowledge and accept food allergies and take steps to ensure that everyone can eat safely and healthily.
-School lunches should have vegetarian options—vegetarian diets are better for the environment and healthy.
-Menus should consider the importance of the microbiome and food digestion and provide foods that foster healthy gut bacteria
-When possible, wild meat (deer, boar) from local sources should be part of the menu
-Menus should be more diverse and feature more international foods as a way to learn about food culture and taste
-Tea should be provided at lunch time besides just milk. Hot and cold options for both tea and milk should be available.

Innovations
School lunches and the spaces in which students eat lunches can be part of the larger community. School lunches could be taken in many innovative directions.
-School lunches should be eaten together in a cafeteria
-The cafeteria is open to the public and anyone can eat together. Increase communication between the public and the school. School serves as a food hub (1).
-The cafeteria could be used as a community kitchen (2) and members from the public could use the space for cooking classes, workshops, parties, etc.
-School lunches should be served in a buffet style where everyone can choose what they want to eat
-The option for eating outside on nice days should be possible. Spaces for picnicking on school grounds should be provided.
-Student birthdays should be celebrated in some way at lunch, maybe through a special desert
-Occasional special menus could be curated by local chefs. School lunch could more like going to a nice restaurant.
-Recipes of school lunch menus should be available to the public so they can replicate the menus at home.

This next step for this process is to develop concrete action plans through backcasting exercises that will be submitted to the local government in Obuse for consideration. We will be sure to keep the FEAST audience updated!

(1) A food hub is defined by USDA as “a centrally located facility with a business management structure facilitating the aggregation, storage, processing, distribution, and/or marketing of locally/regionally produced food products.”
(2) A definition of a community kitchen is “a group of people who meet on a regular basis to plan, cook and share healthy, affordable meals.” (Community Kitchen Australia)

Presentation on School Lunch by Iwashima (Photo: FEAST)

Presentation on visioning results by each group (Photo: FEAST)

Graphic recording (Photo: FEAST)

Graphic recording (Photo: FEAST)

Final Poster (Photo: FEAST)

Thank you all for joining us! (Photo: FEAST)

学校給食の理想の未来像を描く(プロジェクトリーダー スティーブン・マックグリービー)

FEAST HQ イベント, セミナー、ワークショップ, レポート

2019年3月24日に、長野県小布施町にて30年後の理想の学校給食について考えるワークショップを開催し、お子様からご年配の方まで約50名に参加頂きました。今回のワークショップは、地域の食に関する政策について市民が協働で考えるネットワーク組織「OBUSE食と農の未来会議」(日本版フードポリシー・カウンシル)の取り組みのひとつです。FEASTはこれまでに長野県北部にて活動を展開しており、OBUSE食と農の未来会議と共に、本イベントを計画してきました。また、開催に向けて、NAGANO農と食の会生活クラブ小布施支部NPO 食育体験教室・コラボのみなさまにもご協力頂きました。参加者の方も幅広く、農家、行政職員、コミュニティオーガナイザー、子どもを持つ親、小・中・高校生などの方々がいらっしゃいました。

なぜ学校給食なのか?
ワークショップでは、FEAST研究推進員の岩島史が、日本の学校給食の歴史とその変遷について報告を行いました。日本社会における学校給食の位置づけは特別なもので、食文化や味に関する教育の役割を担うだけでなく、その時代に優先すべきとされた事項を反映し促進してきました。例えば、第二次世界大戦後には、学校給食は全ての小学生に対し提供されていました。しかし、現在は大規模な調理センター方式へと変わり、主眼とされているのはコスト削減です。そうした中で、地産食材の使用は進んでいますが、果たしてそれだけで充分な取り組みと言えるのでしょうか。今後、少子化の影響で生徒数は減少し、地域経済はますます不安定になり、自然環境の破壊も進んでいきます。そこで、学校給食ではどのようなものが提供されるべきなのか、また学校給食は社会全体の中でどのような役割を担うことができるのか、といった問いについて再検討することは必然であると考えます。

真の意味での超学際的な取り組みとして、未来の学校給食の理想像をどのように描き、決定するかについては、FEASTのメンバーと地元のオーガナイザーとで慎重に検討しました。ビジョニングのターゲットは、普段から関連する活動を行っている人々のみでなく、より大きな集団に訴えかけるものでなくてはなりません(ビジョニング手法については、こちらのブログをご参照ください)。このため、私たちは議論を何度も重ねてきました。今回のワークショップを主催したOBUSE食と農の未来会議は、小布施町にて持続可能で革新的な食に関する政策を立案することを目指し、2018年秋に設立されました。政策立案に向けた第一歩として、今回のビジョニング・ワークショップを計画してきました。また、小布施町町長の市村良三氏をはじめとする小布施町役場の職員の方々には、多大なるご支援とご協力を頂きました。今回の準備段階の議論に参加した方からは、小布施町の規模は、例えば長野市と比較して小さいので、学校給食に関する新しい食の政策の実行はスムーズに行えるのではないかとの声が多く上がりました。また、今回ご協力頂いたNAGANO農と食の会は、有機生産者、弁当販売者、企業、市民・消費者、といったさまざまな方々の集まった団体ですが、今回のワークショップでテーマを学校給食に絞ることに賛同頂き、小布施町での取り組みを長野県全体に展開できればと考えていらっしゃいます。

未来の学校給食の理想像
今回のワークショップでは、学校給食の未来のあるべき姿について、興味引かれる新鮮なアイデアが数多く生まれました。また、グラフィックレコーダーの有賀優氏に、次々と生まれたアイデアを素晴らしいポスターにして頂きました(写真参照)。そして、ビジョンは以下の4つのテーマに沿ってグループ分けしました:基本方針、食と給食を通じた学校教育の再定義、給食の献立、イノベーション(革新)

基本方針
-給食に影響を及ぼすような食に関する政策について、地域住民の決定権を強化する。
-給食に関する決定プロセスの透明性を向上させる。給食の食材の調達先、栽培方法、また一定の質を確保するために必要な財務意思決定プロセスの可視化を進める。
-「食育」という名が示すよう、給食を義務教育の一環と捉え、無償化を図る。県または市町村の自治体が全額を補助する。
-地元産の食材を(可能な限り100%を目指して)優先的に使用し、地域経済を活性化する。
-生徒および環境にとって安心安全な学校給食を目指す。有機栽培された食材を使用し、遺伝子組み換え食材の使用を避ける。
-給食のバリューチェーンにおける食品廃棄物ゼロを目指す。食品廃棄物は肥料または家畜飼料へとリサイクルする。
-給食の意思決定プロセスへの女性の参画と、意思決定機関における意思決定ポストへの女性の採用を可能な限り拡大する。

食と給食を通じた学校教育の再定義
我々は、食の生産と消費を通じて、人生において有用な技能を習得することができます。食という切り口から暮らしや自然システムの価値を理解することも可能となります。例えば、栄養知識、家庭菜園、動物の飼育、料理、肥沃な土づくりなどは、全ての人が習得すべきライフスキル(生活技能)といえます。学校内での食の生産、準備、消費を組み込むような包括的教育カリキュラムが理想と考えられます。こうした教育の一例としては、「自耕」が挙げられます。自耕とは、我々の口にする食べものがどこから来たのか、また身体に良い食べものを育てるにはどうしたら良いのかといった問いについて学ぶことで、自分自身の成長につなげるものです。
-学校の校庭に広い菜園を整備し、野菜やキノコ類の栽培、鶏の飼育、果樹園の運営などを通じて、食糧生産能力を高める。
-学校プールを使用期間外に、魚の養殖用水槽として活用する。
-食肉用の動物の解体を生徒自ら経験し、食のために生命を頂く責任について学ぶ。
-生徒が給食の調理過程に参加し、レシピを学び、キッチンスキルを習得する。
-生徒が加工品作りを学び、給食で使う味噌や漬物づくりを行う。
-生徒は自分で作った食器(コップ、皿、椀)で給食を食べる。また、後片付けは生徒が行う。
-給食の時間に余裕を与え、ゆっくり楽しく食事を取る機会とする(コンヴィヴィアルな(共愉のための)給食)。

給食の献立
給食で何を食べるかは、生徒の学業に影響を与え得るものであり、また多様な食の選択肢に関する情報を与え、健康的な選択肢を紹介するものです。
-学校側は食物アレルギーを適切に把握した上で食材を選び、全員が安心して、健康上の問題なく給食を食べることができるよう適切な対策を講じる。
-ベジタリアン(菜食主義)対応メニューを選択肢として追加する-菜食は環境にも健康にも良い。
-給食の献立は、マイクロバイオーム(微生物叢)や消化の重要性を考慮したものとし、腸内細菌を育て、整える食材を使用する。
-可能なかぎり、地元で獲れたシカやイノシシなどの野生鳥獣肉を献立に組み込む。
-食文化や味について学ぶことができるように、献立は多様性を重視し、海外の料理も取り込む。
-牛乳だけでなく、お茶も提供する。お茶、牛乳両方とも、ホットとアイスの選択肢を作る。

イノベーション(革新)
給食と給食を食べる空間は、学校内に留まらず、より広域なコミュニティの一環となり得るものです。その方向性はさまざまで革新的なものとなり得ます。
-給食は、食堂で教職員・生徒が揃って食べる。
-食堂は一般にも開かれた場とし、地域住民は誰でも共に食事を取れる。こうした共食を通じて、地域住民と学校の交流を促す。また、学校がフードハブ(1)の役割も担う。
-食堂はコミュニティキッチン(2)として、一般の方も料理教室、ワークショップ、パーティーなどに利用可能とする。
-給食はバイキング形式で提供し、食べたいものを選択する自由を与える。
-天候の良い日は、屋外で給食を食べる選択肢を与える。校庭にピクニック形式で給食を取れるスペースを設ける。
-生徒の誕生日を給食の時間を使って祝う。一案としては、誕生日用デザートなど。
-地元レストランのシェフ監修の特別メニューを定期的に提供する。給食がレストランに行く疑似体験に近いものとなる。
-給食メニューのレシピは、家庭で再現できるように一般にも公開する。

次のステップは、バックキャスティング手法を用いて具体的なアクションプランを策定し、小布施町に提出することです。今後も随時アップデートしていきますので、よろしくお願い致します。

(1)フードハブとは、米国農務省の定義によると、「地元で採れた食品の集約、保存、加工、流通、マーケティングといった機能が集約された経営管理体制を有した施設」である。
(2)コミュニティキッチンとは、「定期的に、健康的で手頃な食事の計画を立て、調理し、共に食べることを目的とした人の集まり」である(Community Kitchen Australia)。

(和訳:Yuko K.)

岩島推進員からの報告(撮影:FEAST)

各グループから発表(撮影:FEAST)

各グループの報告内容をその場でポスターに(撮影:FEAST)

グラフィックレコーディングの様子(撮影:FEAST)

完成したポスター(撮影:FEAST)

たくさんの方にご参加頂きました!(撮影:FEAST)