Playing with food in FEAST's gaming workshops (Astrid Mangnus, Utrecht University)

FEAST HQ Report, WG2

On the 11th and 28th of May, FEAST hosted two gaming workshops in a series of activities around the future of food in collaboration with Prof. Joost Vervoort and myself, visiting researchers form Utrecht University, the Netherlands. Earlier activities include three backcasting focus groups for the food future of Kyoto prefecture and a series of workshops in Noshiro, Akita prefecture. The use of games is a new and fun way of exploring possible futures. In both workshops the participants played two games: a video game and a card game. We were interested in both the effect that the method of gaming had on the participants, as well as the plans …

Exploring better food futures for Kyoto prefecture through visioning and back-casting (Astrid Mangnus, Utrecht University)

FEAST HQ Report, WG2

At the center of FEAST’s research are the complex sustainability issues faced by modern-day agrifood systems. One of the ways in which the project aims to address these challenges is by envisioning plausible futures and initiating democracy-oriented food experiments and actions. Visioning is a method that can be used to paint a clear picture of such a plausible future. Back-casting is a method in which a pathway to the envisioned future is made, working back from the future to the present. On the 25th and the 26th of April, FEAST put these methods to work for Kyoto prefecture. In collaboration with visiting researchers from Utrecht University, three visioning and back-casting …

Paper on the Carbon Minus Project, Kameoka City published in Annals of Environmental Science

FEAST HQ WG4_Publications

A journal article “A Rural Revitalization Scheme in Japan Utilizing Biochar and Eco-Branding: The Carbon Minus Project, Kameoka City” by Steven McGreevy, FEAST PL, and Prof. Akira Shibata, WG4 Chair/Ritsumeikan University was published in “Annals of Environmental Science” vol.4, 11-22(2010). Abstract: Like rural areas in many countries, Japanese rural society is experiencing decline in all spheres (depopulation, aging, lack of economic opportunity, and so on). Uncertainty in the future viability of agricultural livelihoods coupled with the collapse of the forestry sector has decreased the ecological resilience of the Japanese countryside, increasing overgrown forests, habitat and biodiversity loss, and costly wildlife damage to crops. As these rural crises are compounded by …