A taste of urban food futures in Bangkok (Steven McGreevy, Project Leader)

FEAST HQ Report, Seminar & Workshop, WG2

Right before the end of 2019, I made my way to Thailand for a short trip to oversee a workshop and reconnect with colleagues. Thailand is a fantastic place to visit for work or pleasure—the food is amazing, the people are incredibly nice, and I always encounter something surprising. Two things struck me during my time in Bangkok: 1) the diversity of ecological food labels and designations and 2) the ubiquitous food delivery scene. Food transparency in Thailand is much more developed than what we see on the shelves in Japan. On a trip through a supermarket one evening, the vegetable section was shocking. There were four different production designations: …

Learning beehive experience in Kameoka (Sittidaj Pongkijvorasin, RIHN Visiting Research Fellow/Chulalongkorn University)

FEAST HQ From the Field, Report

On June 12th, FEAST’s researcher Max Spiegelberg, RIHN guest researcher Rika Shinkai and I joined a small international session on the Asian Honeybee Apis cerana and the beekeeping practices organized by Professor Fumio Sakamoto at Kyoto Gakuen University in Kameoka, who is also the founder of Kyoto apis cerana japonica Lab.  Besides us, also Tai Ezumi from NPO Terra Rennaissance, promoting beekeeping within a project on community development in a landmine contaminated area in Cambodia as well as Ikumi and Yuichi Shiga from the Japanese Bee Weekend Beekeepers Club among others attended. We learned that different types of honeybees have different habitats. The Asian bee (Apis cerana) has 4 sub-species …

Two consumers’ focus group discussions were conducted for the research on future vision of Thai consumers on sustainable food consumption practice (Kanang Kantamaturapoj, Mahidol University/WG2)

FEAST HQ Report, WG2

Two workshops were set up in Bangkok on 15 July 2017 with Thai consumers to investigate consumer perspectives on future sustainable food purchasing and eating out. Transition theory is used as a framework of this study. The development  of  novel  solutions  for  more  sustainable  food consumption  practices need the  involvement across a range of spheres, tiers and disciplines. Therefore, we intendeded to recruit a spectrum of attendees. The participants of focus group included consumers from three clusters; 1) green consumers (regular organic food consumers), 2) non-green consumers and 3) innovative consumers. Different consumer groups were exposed to different types of activities, different social perceptions norms, and different lifestyle.  Various consumer …